Mercy Home Heroes Spotlight: Scotty Longmire

Mercy Home Heroes Spotlight: Scotty Longmire

When Scotty Longmire went out for his first marathon training run in 2010, he could barely make it a mile. But he had just become a father, and because he did so later in life compared to most of his friends, he was determined to create an active lifestyle. 
 
“I’ve come to use the term ‘remaining physically relevant,’” Longmire said. “I needed something to do that would allow me to do that and still be able to chase my son around and throw the ball around well into my 50’s.”
 
Though he struggled to run a mile when he started, Longmire completed the Bank of America Chicago Marathon in 2010 and again in 2011. The training process kickstarted the active lifestyle he desired, and though he didn’t participate in any races from 2012 to 2017, he continued to run.
 
In 2018, Longmire started to lose steam. He wasn’t running as much and needed motivation. As fate would have it, a post about our Mercy Home Heroes team on Facebook rekindled the flame.
 
“When I saw that, I knew immediately that it was something that I needed to do,” said Longmire. “My grandfather lived at Mercy Home when he was a young boy, and his parents were immigrants from Ireland. By the time he was 8, they had both passed away.”
 
Longmire’s grandfather stayed at Mercy Home until he was old enough to join the Marine Corps. He went on to fight in World War II. When Longmire discovered letters written by former Mercy Home residents stationed overseas during WWII, it provided a special connection to his grandfather’s experience. 

My grandfather lived at Mercy Home when he was a young boy, and his parents were immigrants from Ireland. By the time he was 8, they had both passed away.

“Even though they weren’t letters written by my grandfather – it was the same mindset, it was the same time, I’m sure the same sentiment that he was going through,” Longmire said. “It was really neat to read those and then share those with my aunts and uncles and cousins as well.”
 
In addition to being a WWII veteran, Longmire’s grandfather was also a Golden Gloves boxer. When Longmire and his family realized the role that boxing played during the early years at Mercy Home, they came to the assumption that the passion was sparked during his time at the Home. 
 
Given his personal connection and desire to start training again, our Heroes team was a perfect fit for Longmire. In 2019, he ran the Chicago Marathon again, but this time as a Hero. 
 
“It’s a privilege to fundraise and to give back to this organization that, back in the early 30’s, allowed our family tree to continue,” Longmire said. 

It’s a privilege to fundraise and to give back to this organization that, back in the early 30’s, allowed our family tree to continue.

“My favorite part was running past Mercy Home and a couple of kids came running out beside me with the Mercy Home banner. Running a marathon in itself is an emotional experience – just the accomplishment of all the training and everything that you’ve set out to do. But then you layer in being able to connect yourself to a team and a charity like we have – it puts it over the top.”
 
Longmire is now a three-time Chicago Marathon finisher, and it’s the only race he has ever entered. There’s something about the energy of the crowds and the spectacle of it all that keeps him coming back. And he had such a great experience in 2019 that he signed up again for 2020 and will run his fourth Chicago Marathon this fall. 
 
Becoming a marathoner has made him a Hero in more ways than one. Not only is he raising crucial funds for our children, who are in the same situation his grandfather was nearly 100 years ago, he is a hero for his own son.
 
“Being able to maintain an active lifestyle and be out with my son – that was the original intention and that’s played out very well,” Longmire said. “And because of the condition I’m in from running, we pick up all kinds of different sports together.” 

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