2021-11-23 14:00:00
2021-12-01 15:00:00

Just Days Away!

Giving Tuesday is almost here! Mark your calendars for November 30!

Give kids a bright future

Just Days Away!

Giving Tuesday is almost here! Mark your calendars for November 30th! On this global day of giving, help give deserving kids a brighter future.

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Time's Running Out

There are only a few hours left to help out families affected by the COVID-19 crisis. Gifts made today will be matched.

#GivingTuesdayNow is almost over. Only a few hours left to help our families affected by the COVID-19 crisis. Gifts made today will be matched up to $50,000 thanks to the generosity of a dedicated group of employees at William Blair and its matching gifts program.

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Your Gift Doubled!

Last chance for your gift to go twice as far!

Support March For Kids

It Begins With You

You can help create a brighter future for Chicago’s children by supporting Mercy Home’s March for Kids this month.

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Hector’s Story

Hector’s Story

“I realized I could be myself”

Thanks to a guidance counselor who wouldn’t give up on a troubled student, a young man was able to escape a dangerous neighborhood and reach his full potential.

As summer approaches, concern has grown, not just at Mercy Home, but throughout Chicagoland, about youth violence in the city. In the midst of the turmoil, stories like Hector’s show that there is hope for a happy ending—thanks to the support of friends like you.

Hector’s story proves that with your contributions, we can help children escape the violent realities of their neighborhoods and flourish in a safe place. Because of all you do, Hector has a successful career giving back to others in need.

Day after day, we hear the tragic news and wonder.

Tonight, a teenage girl from Chicago’s South Side is recovering after she was hit by a stray bullet. – How can we provide a safe place for young people seemingly trapped in a web of despair? How many times will we see potential loss? – [News Anchor]

We heard the gunshots. We heard about 50 shots the first time. – [Woman]

It can feel hopeless. Then we meet someone like Hector Morales: accomplished, eloquent, polished. No signs today of his difficult childhood. – [News Anchor]

I distinctly remember one time I was walking out of my home, and uh, one of the boyhood…one of my childhood friends that I knew, he was a little older about 14, 15, was being chased by the police and being shot at. – [Hector]

Hector was born in Puerto Rico into what he calls a “Third World existence.” – [News Anchor]

You’re not gonna let anybody push you around. You’re not gonna let anybody talk to you, and if they threaten you, you’re not gonna…you’re not gonna back down. And that’s one of the reasons why you kinda become a tough eight year old or seven year old. – [Hector]

His mother trying to escape poverty and violence, moved Hector and his siblings to Chicago, in the Uptown community. – [News Anchor]

I’m sure she wanted him to have all the opportunities of the American dream. And that neighborhood did not provide that for Hector. – [Father Donahue]

In fact, Hector’s uncle was shot in the stomach in the neighborhood. New home, same dangers. – [News Anchor]

As a child, they would have pitbull fights in the front yard on my street, on Kenmore Street. – [Hector]

The neighborhood kids fought, too. Hector was right there with them, stealing and spraying graffiti. – [News Anchor]

The negative impact it had on me was I never learned how to socialize outside of that small world. –  [Hector]

At Senn High School, he resisted the best intentions of his teachers. – [News Anchor]

There’s no structure in my neighborhood, we do whatever we want. You’re telling me I gotta do this homework? I’m not doing that. – [Hector]

A school counselor wouldn’t give up on Hector and had a suggestion. – [News Anchor]

A woman who’s recognized in him gifts and talents and said, “You are better than this. And there is a place here in Chicago called Mercy Home for Boys & Girls.”  So Hector Morales would give the Mercy Home for Boys & Girls a chance. Since 1887, it had saved the lives of thousands of young people. Hector hated it. – [News Anchor]

It was awful. I just, I couldn’t, you know, I– I couldn’t stand it. You know, they’re telling me I can’t stay out late, I gotta go to school… – [Hector]

Mercy Home is a real home. Our children are loved. And in any family, there are rules aimed at teaching respect and responsibility. – [Father Donahue]

I had to clean, I had to clean the kitchen, I had to clean the dishes, I had to clean the toilet, you know, that kind of thing. And, uh, that was very difficult for me. – [Hector]

But Hector finally had structure and discipline and therapy to knock down those walls he had built to simply survive on the street. –  [News Anchor]

He knew that the people at Mercy Home, my coworkers, were there for him. And once he began to trust in that, and to trust in those who surrounded him with this family experience, with love, things opened up. The shell was broken. -[Father Donahue]

You were so tough for so long, and there you didn’t have to be that way. Once I realized that, I realized that, uh, I can be myself a little more. – [Hector]

What was “yourself?” – A kid that wanted to love life. – [Interviewer]

Hector finished high school and went on to college. Over five years, he attended law school at night. Now an attorney remembering what it was like for his family when they came to Chicago from Puerto Rico, he represents immigrants as they try to find the American dream. – [News Anchor]

So it was weird, it was like What was “yourself?” –  [Hector]

A kid that wanted to love life. – Hector finished high school and went on to college. Over five years, he attended law school at night. Now an attorney remembering what it was like for his family when they came to Chicago from Puerto Rico, he represents immigrants as they try to find the American dream. – [News Anchor]

So it was weird, it was like full circle, that I was able to help out these immigrant folks because that was my life when I was a kid. – [Hector]

Look at Hector’s life. Many miracles happened. Look how Hector is spending his life now; helping those who are less fortunate. – [Father Donahue]

The next time you see the tragedies on our streets, remember Hector Morales and the Mercy Home for Boys & Girls, and how your generosity gives us all hope. – [News Anchor]

It’s a divine good to give to Mercy. I mean, if anyone has ever the opportunity to come and see for themselves, they’ll see. Um, it’s just, yeah, it’s just an incredibly good thing you’re doing by helping these young people. – I want to say thank you to all of our donors. You make this miracle of God’s Mercy happen each and every day. You are angels. – [Father Donahue]

You can help save a life.

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