2021-04-01 18:00:00
2021-05-01 01:00:00

Take our pledge

April is Child Abuse Awareness and Prevention Month.

Help End Child Abuse

Help End Child Abuse

This month is National Child Abuse Prevention Month. Take our pledge to end child abuse and neglect.

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Time's Running Out

There are only a few hours left to help out families affected by the COVID-19 crisis. Gifts made today will be matched.

#GivingTuesdayNow is almost over. Only a few hours left to help our families affected by the COVID-19 crisis. Gifts made today will be matched up to $50,000 thanks to the generosity of a dedicated group of employees at William Blair and its matching gifts program.

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Your Gift Doubled!

Last chance for your gift to go twice as far!

Support March For Kids

It Begins With You

You can help create a brighter future for Chicago’s children by supporting Mercy Home’s March for Kids this month.

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Helping Your Teen Find a Job: 5 Tips for Job Interviews

Helping Your Teen Find a Job: 5 Tips for Job Interviews

If your teenager has made it this far, congratulations! An interview offer means an applicant made a strong impression and is being seriously considered. To help your teen have a successful interview, here are some basic tips you can share:

  1. Arrive 10 minutes early with your cell phone off and out of sight.
  2. Dress conservatively and professionally. Employers assume an interviewee looks the best that he or she is going to look. If your teen wears an un-tucked shirt or stained pants, it sends the message that he or she would not bother to meet a dress code once hired.
  3. No strong odor (B.O. or perfume), un-fresh breath or overdone make-up, hair, nails or jewelry. An applicant should be remembered for solid answers, not for hot breath, strong perfume, or flashy nails.
  4. Learn about the company. Encourage your teen to Google the employer and read basic information. When the interviewer asks if he or she has any questions, your child should ask a question about the company. It will show he or she has done research and is intelligent, mature and dedicated to becoming employed!
  5. Practice basic interview questions. Your teenager can look up common questions online, write down his or her answers and practice saying them aloud, or with you.

Employers are not looking for someone with all the right answers, or who already knows everything about the job. They want to hire someone they can teach. Your child should feel comfortable applying to entry-level positions even if they have little experience. Just help your teen market him or herself as eager to learn, willing to try hard, and pleasant to spend time with.

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